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Roman Road at Beth Shean

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Beth Shean is a dramatic archaeological site in Israel. It is one of the ten Roman decapolis cities, and only one of two decapolis cities located in Israel today. When you visit Beth Shean, you will be walking through extensive Roman ruins of a city that was thriving at the time of Jesus.

This main street was decorated with statues.  Seen below is a Corinthian capital
of a pillar, bearing the head of the Greek god Dionysus (Dionysos, also
commonly known by his Roman name Bacchus), the god of wine and the patron of the
city. According to Greek mythology the city was founded by the wine God Dionysos
who lived in the city. According to the legend,  his nursemaid Nysa who
breast-fed him was buried in the city, so it was named Nysa-Scythopolis or Nisa.

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Red Poppies in Israel

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Papaver umbonatum, also known as the "corn poppy," is native to Israel as well as to other Middle Eastern countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, such as Lebanon and Syria. It grows mostly in woodlands and shrublands, both on the coast and near the base of Mt. Hermon in the southeast. The petals are a bright shade of red, while the pistil and stamen inside are black. The flowers grows in bunches on the ground with the stems rising over a foot high. The Papaver blossoms annually in March, April and May.

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Ashqelon -the Mound of Ashqelon sign- Philistine city

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Ca. 1175 BCE, The Philistines, migrating from the Agean Basin, arrived at Ashqelon and captured it.Ashqelon was one of the five principal Philistine cities: "Five lords of the Philistines: the Gazathites, and the Ashdothites, and the Esqelonites, and the Gittites and the Ekronites." (Joshua 13,3). So far, the remains of the Philistine city have only been partially excavated, and seems to indicate the existence of a large fortified city (ca. 150 acres in size).

Ashkelon is a coastal city in the Southern District of Israel on the Mediterranean coast, 50 kilometres south of Tel Aviv, and 13 kilometres north of the border with the Gaza Strip. The ancient seaport of Ashkelon dates back to the Neolithic Age

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Pool at Beit She'an

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The outside pool is seen below. The floors are paved with marble slabs and mosaics.

The city in the North District of Israel which has played an important role historically due to its geographical location at the junction of the Jordan River Valley and Jezreel Valley. It has also played an important role in modern times, acting as the regional center for the numerous villages in the Beit She'an Valley Regional Council.

The ancient city ruins are now protected as an Israeli national park, known as Bet She'an National Park.

 

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Ruins of Temple of Pan at Casearea

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Remnants of the Temple of Pan (the Greek god of desolate places) in Caesarea Philippi.

Caesarea Philippi (Ancient Greek Καισαρεία Φιλίππεια) or Caesarea Paneas (Καισαρεία Πανειάς) was an ancient Roman city located at the southwestern base of Mount Hermon, adjacent to a spring, grotto, and related shrines dedicated to the Greek god Pan, and called "Banias, Paneas", or Baniyas (not to be confused with Baniyas in northwestern Syria). The surrounding region was known as the "Panion".

The city is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew[1] and Mark.[2] The city is now uninhabited, an archaeological site in the Golan Heights.

Banias does not appear in the Old Testament. Philostorgius, Theodoret, Benjamin of Tudela, and Samuel ben Samson all incorrectly identified it with Laish (Tel Dan),[3][4][5] while Eusebius of Caesarea accurately places Dan/laish in the vicinity of Paneas at the fourth mile on the route to Tyre

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Greek God Pan's Grotto

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View of Pan's grotto (the Greek god of desolate places)in Caesarea Philippi.

Panias is a spring, also known as Banias, named for Pan, the Greek god of desolate places. It lies close to the fabled "way of the sea" mentioned by Isaiah,[7] along which many armies of Antiquity marched. In the distant past a giant spring gushed from a cave in the limestone bedrock, tumbling down the valley to flow into the Huela marshes. Currently it is the source of the stream Nahal Senir

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Caesarea Maritima

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Caesarea Maritima is a national park on the Israeli coastline, near the town of Caesarea. The ancient Caesarea Maritima city and harbor was built by Herod the Great about 25–13 BCE.

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Synagogue at Capernaum

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The ancient synagogue of Capernaum.

Capernaum is frequently mentioned in the Gospels and was Jesus' main base during his Galilean ministry. It is referred to as Jesus' "own city" (Mt 9:1; Mk 2:1) and a place where he lived (Mt 1:13). He probably chose it simply because it was the home of his first converts, Peter and Andrew (Mk 1:21, 29).

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Synagogue at Capernaum

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Side view of the synagogue at Capernaum and ancient homes.

Capernaum was a fishing village in the time of the Hasmoneans. Located on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee. It had a population of about 1,500. Archaeological excavations have revealed two ancient synagogues built one over the other

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